TRAINING DOGS

Dogs!!

A word which can change any atmosphere at any particular time. It’s mention could set heels running helter skelter or knees go down in admiration of fur and love. So why train a dog? Or why own a dog in the first place?
The dog is an amazing creature you would love to keep, own and admire. The reason why some people treat dogs with disgust remains a mystery yet to be unravelled.
When you are bored, you could coil its large ears in your hands and place it in a pot of wonder and self doubt or you could scold at a few of the stray ones you find just outside your home just because you are angry. You could also put it on a leash and go for a walk just to teach it the other side of town.
The dog is uniquely attuned to the human behaviour and continues to assist the human race from hunting and clubbing for food to assisting the military catch cronnies. Some dogs even pull the invisible reins of  locked men in wheel chairs. Such amazing creatures!
Every sound a dog makes a difference in saving your life or the life the person next door. Well they could also help you lose that extra weight by finishing off the extra calories you would throttle down your neck with pain. Odynophagia
The dog’s senses see, smell , hear , taste and touch. An interesting phenomenon which phases polls of people is magnetoreception – being sensitive to the earth’s magnetic field.

The canine can steer its way through streaks of sand and silt, nolly through neglect and still return home with that hearty bark. Through this they perceive and receive the altitude, direction and location and respond with movement.
Back to the reason for this blog post, there are three types of dog intelligence:
⦁ Adaptive Intelligence (learning and problem-solving ability) refers to a dog’s ability to solve problems on its own.
⦁ Instinctive Intelligence refers to a dog’s ability to perform the tasks it was bred for, such as herding, pointing, fetching, guarding, or supplying companionship. This is specific to the individual animal and is measured by canine IQ tests.
⦁ Working/Obedience Intelligence refers to a dog’s ability to learn from humans. This is breed dependent.

It is paramount you know the type of breed you are training in the first place in order not to elevate any blockhead who would chew your trousers later just because it wanted to wear the trousers.
A smart dog is just potential without a human willing to put in the time and effort to train and channel the dog’s intelligence. While all dogs are trainable, it’s important to understand your dog’s inherent abilities in order to know how to motivate him and bring out his natural intelligence.

Here is a list of the 10 smartest dog breeds. Is your dog one of them?

 

Border collie
The Border collie is energetic, affectionate, and — of course — smart. A Border collie dog is a true working dog excelling in sheep herding, athleticism, agility, and cuddling. Border collies are also known for their “herding eye,” an intense gaze used to stare down and herd other animals.

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Poodle
The poodle is the seventh most popular dog breed and for good reason. Poodles not only are very smart, but they’re also proud, active dogs, with the added benefit of being hypoallergenic. Because of their high intelligence, poodles can be easily trained to track, hunt, retrieve, and obey. In fact, poodles are the national dog of France where they were first used as retrievers.

Cute white male poodle puppy

German shepherd
It’s no surprise that a German shepherd is the second most popular dog breed because they’re courageous, confident, and smart. They are excellent all-purpose workers and are used in a number of specialized situations as police dogs or service dogs. German shepherds don’t always give affection lightly, but they are fiercely loyal family dogs that are great with kids.

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Golden retriever
Golden retrievers are intelligent, friendly, and devoted sporting dogs. Goldens take their jobs to heart and try to be the best at what they do, whether it’s hunting, serving as a seeing-eye dog, working in search-and-rescue, or simply being a loving companion.

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Doberman pinscher
Besides strength, endurance, and speed, Doberman pinschers have the smarts necessary to retain training in order to be an in-demand police dog or war dog. There is even a bronze Doberman pinscher statue titled “Always Faithful” at the National War Dog Cemetery in Guam to honor the dogs — mostly Dobermans — that were killed in service during the Second Battle of Guam in 1944.

doberman-pinscher-dog

Shetland sheepdog
The Shetland sheepdog is basically a miniature working collie. They are playful and intelligent herding dogs that love to learn new tricks and play with kids. Shelties are affectionate and loyal with their families. But they’re also great watchdogs because they are reserved towards strangers and have a tendency to bark at people.

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Labrador retriever
Besides being intelligent, gentle, and family-friendly, Labrador retrievers are also the most popular dog breed in the United States. Because Labs want to please their Pack Leader, they are excellent guide dogs and rescue dogs.

labrador-retriever-dog-pictures-8

Papillon
The papillon is an alert, friendly, and happy dog. Papillon means “butterfly” in French, and the papillon was given this name because of its butterfly-like ears. Papillons aren’t shy or aggressive and are especially fast and versatile little athletes that can be trained to do all kinds of tricks.

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Bloodhound
Bloodhounds are known for their long wrinkled faces and big droopy ears, but they’re also known for being independent, inquisitive, and friendly. As far as intelligence, bloodhounds have been recognized for their determination and scenting power as far back as the third century.

bloodhound-main

Rottweiler
The Rottweiler is a loyal, loving, confident guard dog who wants to work. Because of this, Rottweilers are best suited to be service dogs, police dogs, herders, therapy dogs, devoted companions, or obedience competitors.

rottweiler_5204379

 

Whether your dog is one of the smartest breeds or not, remember that every Pack Leader can teach and train their dog with patience, consistency, and the right energy regardless of that dog’s breed or age.

Having a trained dog isn’t the same as having a balanced dog, but if your dog knows a few basic commands, it can be helpful when tackling problem behaviors — existing ones or those that may develop in the future.

So where do you start with dog obedience training? You could take a class, but it’s not necessary; you can do it yourself. In fact, with the right attitude, it can be fun for both you and your dog!
The first is
Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

Put a leash and collar on your dog.
Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

Place a treat in both hands.
Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “TRAINING DOGS

  1. u have a wonderful post here.,,i remember our dog abroad..we had a storm in our country and the dog was with my mom and dad, our roof collapsed and we lost the house but during that time, the dog was restless trying to keep my parents safe..she is our hero..everytime i see a lab, i think about her….
    keep blogging, will be following u

    Liked by 1 person

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